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  3. Appointing a Lasting Power of Attorney (LPA)

Appointing a Lasting Power of Attorney (LPA)

The LPA is a legal document which allows a person of at least 21 years of age, to voluntarily appoint one or more persons to make decisions and act on his behalf should he loses mental capacity or has been certified to be incapable of managing his own affairs one day. The appointed person “donee” can act on behalf of the donor in two broad areas of personal welfare and property & affairs matters. Personal welfare matters include where you live and eat, and who you can contact. Property and affairs matters include selling properties and investing savings.

Benefits of an LPA

Making an LPA in advance not only allows you to safeguard your interests but also minimizes the stress and difficulties your loved ones will face when you do lose your mental capacity. Your loved ones will not have to apply for the court order, which can be a tedious process.

Early preparations not only helps protect your interests should you become vulnerable one day. It also gives you time to make a concerted decision of who your trusted proxy decision maker is. He or she should be reliable and competent to act in his or her best interests.

Situations when LPA is important

  • Has dependents, especially minors/special needs children, who will be vulnerable in absence of parent/guardian
  • Nearing old age – risk of diseases associated with loss of mental capacity being much higher
  • Has substantial amounts in CPF accounts and wants to access them especially during emergencies. In order to tap on Medisave account, you will need to sign the Medical Claims Authorization Form. If you lack mental capacity and do not have an LPA to authorize someone else to sign it, you will not be able to use it for hospitalization bill.

Cost to make an LPA

Since 12 January 2016, the LPA E-Service Portal was introduced to allow the public to prepare an LPA application in soft copy and submit registry search requests, and enable donors and deputies to update their particulars online.

To encourage more Singaporeans to pre-plan, the Office of the Public Guardian (OPG) has extended the LPA application fee waiver till end August 2020 for Singaporeans making an LPA Form 1.

The LPA application fees are as follow:
LPA Form 1 Fee 
(inclusive of GST)
LPA Form 2 Fee
(inclusive of GST)
Singapore Citizens $0
(fee of $75 waived till 31 Aug 2020)
$200
Singapore Permanent Residents $100 $250
Foreigners $250 $300

Cancellation of registration of an LPA is $25 (inclusive of GST).

On top of the application fee, applicants are required to pay a fee to engage an LPA Certificate Issuer to witness and certify their application. The fees charged depends on the complexity of the case. The 10 most visited accredited medical practitioners charge fees ranging from $25 to $80, with most charging $50, for the certificate issuing service.

All applications should be submitted to the Office of the Public Guardian.

LPA Certificate Issuer

The LPA certificate issuer signs on the LPA Form as a witness for the Donor, to certify that the Donor has the mental capacity to make an LPA. He understands the purpose of the LPA and the scope of authority granted to Donees. The LPA certificate issuer also ensures that there is no fraud or undue influence used to induce the Donor to make the LPA.

Click here to view the list of most visited LPA Certificate Issuers and the fees they charge. This list includes Charities and Non-Government Organisations who also offer LPA Certificate Issuing services.

What if…

If you do not make an LPA and subsequently lose your mental capacity to make certain decisions, the Mental Capacity Act allows someone else to apply to the Court to either make the specific decisions for you or appoint one or more persons to be your deputy to make the decision for you.

No-one wants to consider getting ill but by creating a Lasting Powers of Attorney (LPA), you have the ability to choose who acts on your behalf and with your best interests at heart should the unimaginable happen. – Karen Leach, Solicitor

Updated on July 20, 2018

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